BCC reconnects water to Pumula

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Tamary Chikiwa

in BULAWAYO

THE Bulawayo City Council (BCC) has restored water supply to Pumula South following a complaint by residents in the suburb.

The residents had been without the precious liquid for at least two weeks as they also had no access to boreholes or bowser water.

The situation had been made worse after the country reverted to a hard lockdown on Tuesday, which meant the residents could not leave their community for fear of falling foul of Covid-19 travel restrictions.

BCC senior public relations officer Nesisa Mpofu told the Daily News yesterday that council is aware of the water situation and they are working on providing residents with the precious liquid during the lockdown.

“Council is aware of the situation in Pumula South which was attended to and supplies were restored,” she said.

Mpofu said council expects to review its water shedding schedule at the end of the month.

She said the three supply dams that had been decommissioned are now back online but the water situation had not yet normalised.

“The new flowserve pumps which are replacing the obsolete ones have been installed at Ncema and Farmhill Pump Stations and are still undergoing technical commissioning,” Mpofu said.

She said the council is working flat out with the contractor responsible for the installation to ensure that the pumps are fully operational as soon as possible.

Bulawayo is facing a water crisis which the city fathers said is mainly due to low dam levels.

Before the council reconnected supply to Pumula South, residents told the Daily News that their taps have been dry for weeks.

“It’s now two weeks without tap water in Pumula South near Asheys area. We don’t have boreholes nearby and there are no bowsers delivering water this side. We need urgent action from the council,” a resident, Paul Guyo, told the Daily News.

Guyo added that residents’ health was at risk as they do not have water for toilet use and other essential services.

“There are flies everywhere. The government is saying we must regularly wash our hands, but how do we do that without water? Our toilets are a mess as we speak,” he said.

Another resident, Nontokozo Nkiwane, said the situation poses a danger to the community, especially given the state of the sewer system in Bulawayo’s western suburbs.

“Soon, you will hear of an outbreak of diseases like typhoid and cholera on top of Covid-19. Whether there is water or not, the sewer system this side is poor, but now it’s serious because there is raw sewage flowing when there is no water,” she said.

Nkiwane said council must come up with measures to provide water to residents in times of crises.

“We understand that our city is facing a water crisis but during such times, measures should be put in place to provide residents with water at least for essential use,” she urged.

Nkiwane said since there are tight lockdown restrictions, residents cannot breach the stipulated 5km radius in search of water.

Tamary Chikiwa
in BULAWAYO 

THE Bulawayo City Council (BCC) has restored water supply to Pumula South following a complaint by residents in the suburb. 

The residents had been without the precious liquid for at least two weeks as they also had no access to boreholes or bowser water. 

The situation had been made worse after the country reverted to a hard lockdown on Tuesday, which meant the residents could not leave their community for fear of falling foul of Covid-19 travel restrictions. 

BCC senior public relations officer Nesisa Mpofu told the Daily News yesterday that council is aware of the water situation and they are working on providing residents with the precious liquid during the lockdown. 

“Council is aware of the situation in Pumula South which was attended to and supplies were restored,” she said. 

Mpofu said council expects to review its water shedding schedule at the end of the month. 

She said the three supply dams that had been decommissioned are now back online but the water situation had not yet normalised. 

“The new flowserve pumps which are replacing the obsolete ones have been installed at Ncema and Farmhill Pump Stations and are still undergoing technical commissioning,” Mpofu said. 

She said the council is working flat out with the contractor responsible for the installation to ensure that the pumps are fully operational as soon as possible. 

Bulawayo is facing a water crisis which the city fathers said is mainly due to low dam levels. 

Before the council reconnected supply to Pumula South, residents told the Daily News that their taps have been dry for weeks. 

“It’s now two weeks without tap water in Pumula South near Asheys area. We don’t have boreholes nearby and there are no bowsers delivering water this side. We need urgent action from the council,” a resident, Paul Guyo, told the Daily News

Guyo added that residents’ health was at risk as they do not have water for toilet use and other essential services. 

“There are flies everywhere. The government is saying we must regularly wash our hands, but how do we do that without water? Our toilets are a mess as we speak,” he said. 

Another resident, Nontokozo Nkiwane, said the situation poses a danger to the community, especially given the state of the sewer system in Bulawayo’s western suburbs.

“Soon, you will hear of an outbreak of diseases like typhoid and cholera on top of Covid-19. Whether there is water or not, the sewer system this side is poor, but now it’s serious because there is raw sewage flowing when there is no water,” she said. 

Nkiwane said council must come up with measures to provide water to residents in times of crises.  

“We understand that our city is facing a water crisis but during such times, measures should be put in place to provide residents with water at least for essential use,” she urged.  

Nkiwane said since there are tight lockdown restrictions, residents cannot breach the stipulated 5km radius in search of water. 

 

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